In response to customer questions about the display, we posted a video detailing the basic setup of the LCD during installation of the kit. You will need to adjust the settings for the motor type, wheel size, and battery voltage in order to match your specific kit.  Detailed instructions are available in the E-BikeKit manual, E-TrikeKit manual and LCD Quickstart Guide
Even though it’s a hefty amount of money to fork over upfront, LaLonde says you’ll likely save money in the long run. If you use public transportation, do the math to see how much you could save over time. If you choose an e-bike over a car, you’re foregoing auto maintenance, gas, insurance, parking fees, and potential tickets, LaLonde adds. “So while there’s sticker shock for a first-time bike buyer, it can still be cost-effective.”
“Our first-generation bike used the same type of 36-volt, 10-amp-hour battery,” he says. “It got between 20 and 30 miles of range, and that’s riding with pedal assist. Using just the throttle you might get 20, less if you’re running on sand or up hills. The charge time is also problematic; with that kind of battery you’re looking at four to six hours, not 90 minutes.”

This bike is designed for quick handling and high speeds, and not for comfort per se. The Focus is all about form following function. This is both good and bad: you have a bike that is sleek, powerful and nimble, but you also are going to be crouched over the front wheel for better control, gripping no-nonsense grips and riding a saddle meant for performance, not cruising.


The Patriot DreamE results from the combination of the popular Day 6 bicycle with the Kinetic8-Fun mid-drive motor kit. The unique Day 6 styling eliminates leaning forward, so you sit perfectly upright. That means there is no more stress on wrists, neck, back, and crotch. It also means a superior breathing position and a better way to enjoy the scenery. The step-through design makes for easy mounts and dismounts, while the low seat allows the rider to reach the ground with both feet for stability and safety.
After you decide which style of e-bike you want, consider the class. In the US, there are three classes defined by the type of assist and how fast the motor will propel you. Most electric bikes sold are class 1 or 3. Class 1 bikes have a motor (max 750w) that assists while you're pedaling, up to 20 mph. Class 3, also known as “speed pedelec” can also have up to a 750w motor, but it can assist you up to 28mph. Both of those are allowed in most states and cities without license. Class 2 have throttles that don't require you to pedal to get a boost. They're allowed on most streets, bike lanes, and paths, but less popular than the other classes and not covered much here (because we still love to pedal and the greater distances pedal assist bikes can cover).
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