Known for not only their powerful line of mountain bikes and specialty bikes—cruisers to fat—Bulls also has a versatile line of urban models. The Cross E Wave comes as one of their more affordable options at roughly $2,800, but at 20 mph can still range for up to 134 in optimal conditions with everything you’d expect (fenders, lock, lights and adjustability). The entire family of Bulls e-bikes has specifications built for any scenario.
To be honest, this bike is really designed for city commuters or kids riding around the suburbs. The fact that it’s foldable will let you carry it on the bus, on the train or even on the plane. It’s just not designed for heavy riding, long distances or tough terrains. If you want something sleek and fabulous at a fraction of the cost of most other e-bikes, this baby’s for you.
One reason for doing so is the way it is powered, which works in a manner that would be familiar to someone accustomed to a manual transmission car. Like a car, you start in a low gear and work your way up as you gain speed. Since the motor runs through your transmission as opposed to applying power directly to the axle, the gear you’re in really matters. The importance of gearing connects you much more to the road and the terrain, which means you are a more active rider than when using throttle-controlled electric bikes.
Whether the terrain is flat or hilly impacts the distance you can travel, as does the weight of the bike, your own weight, the gearing available on the bike, and how much juice you give it. We suggest that a distance of 10 to 20 miles is a realistic expectation. Of course, if you're prepared to do at least some pedaling, you can extend that dramatically.
Electric Bike Parts, what fits my older electric bike? What can I modify to fit my bike? A brief overview of what electric bike parts do, and how generic electric bike parts can be adapted to your bike. The Plugs, Wires & Connectors Hardly a day goes by without a call that goes about like this; "I have a (whatever) electric bike that I used to ride 6 years ago....

E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque and others are quieter. But generally all four make good options. Look for motor output (in watts) which will give you an idea of total power. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a better figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a truer reflection of power.
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