Stealth Electric Bikes redefine the ride experience. With a top speed of 30 mph (Fighter) and 50 mph (Bomber) in virtual silence, they are the toughest and most powerful hybrid electric bikes available anywhere in the world. Stealth bikes combine cutting edge technology with pedal power allowing the rider to experience the freedom, silence and agility of a mountain bike, with the acceleration, speed and thrill of a dirt bike.
Durability. You’re paying a lot of money and a costly investment that lasts for a short time is not worthwhile. The electric bike has more components than the common bike, adding the electric motor and the battery; more attention should be put in selection of the bike because of this. You don’t want your electric bike to turn into a regular bike in a short period.
The body is made from light and durable aluminum. The handlebar comes with simple controls to let you accelerate, brake, monitor battery life, operate headlights and of course…sound the horn. There’s even an USB point that will let you charge your iPhone or Android on the go. The bike can reach a top speed of 10mph. Feel the wind in your hair as you zoom up and down hills and past all that city traffic…

More powerful pedelecs which are not legally classed as bicycles are dubbed S-Pedelecs (short for Schnell-Pedelecs, i.e. Speedy-Pedelecs) in Germany. These have a motor more powerful than 250 watts and less limited, or unlimited, pedal-assist, i.e. the motor does not stop assisting the rider once 25 km/h has been reached. S-Pedelec class e-bikes are therefore usually classified as mopeds or motorcycles rather than as bicycles and therefore may (depending on the jurisdiction) need to be registered and insured, the rider may need some sort of driver's license (either car or motorcycle) and motorcycle helmets may have to be worn.[14] In the United States, many states have adopted S-Pedelecs into the Class 3 category. Class 3 ebikes are limited to <=750 watts of power and 28 mph.[15]
E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque and others are quieter. But generally all four make good options. Look for motor output (in watts) which will give you an idea of total power. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a better figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a truer reflection of power.
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