Added help on the hills: An extra boost on the hills or when cycling into a headwind is probably the first thing most people think about when they’re considering an electric bike. If you live in a valley where the only way out is up, then having a bit of motor assistance may mean the difference between a happy cycling experience and not cycling at all.
In the year 1885, a British man named J.K. Stanley introduced what can fairly be described as the first modern bicycle. His Rover bike had wheels of equal size in the front and back and used a chain connecting the pedals and the rear wheel as a propulsion system. It was often marketed as a safety bike in contrast with the unstable Penny Farthing, and was a smashing success. The company went on to develop motorcycles and automobiles, remaining in business until the year 2005.
If you’re interested in an ebike, you have a couple of options: converting your existing bike or buying an electric version. Abadie says a bike suitable for conversion will have a powerful brake system, wider tires and a strong frame that can hold the motor and battery. He charges $800 to $1,200 to find the right parts and motors for a particular bike.
A vertical bike rack for your car that can fit up to six bikes at once! Works with all different sizes and types of bikes... even fat tire, kids, recumbents and tricycles. Unlike many horizontal hang-style racks this thing can accommodate step-thru and wave bike frames without the need for a crossbar adapter, the rack folds down for easy storage...
A letter from Casey Evans to Electric Bike Technologies, makers of the E-BikeKit™ electric bike conversion kit system. This one of kind adaptive electric stroller was designed by students from California State University-Sacramento using two 500w direct-drive hub motors controlled by a single E-BikeKit system. Thank you for enabling me to take my daughter hiking! My name is Casey Evans and my daughter, Montel, was born with a very rare...
There are two basic categories of electric bike, and their uses don't offer equal crossover value. The first category is essentially a normal bicycle that has been outfitted with an electric motor. These bikes are the same size as a standard bicycle, and handle almost identically, save for the obvious benefit of added motive power thanks to a motor and battery.
In full-electric mode, the Pedego City Commuter Classic Electric Bike is capable of moving at up to 20 mph for anywhere from 15 to 30 miles. There are two further options: power-assisted pedaling or fully "unplugged” riding. Renowned Shimano gears are easy to select. Seldom do we come across a product so universally praised by owners. It's not cheap, but comments like "Everything I hoped for!" and "Outstanding!" tell us that it's money well spent.
James LaLonde, senior brand manager for Cannondale, agrees. He says their entry-level (read: good for beginners and more affordable) e-bike—the Quick Neo—has a battery life that lasts up to 70 miles. “If you ride for a full day, you may want to recharge it before you go to bed. But if you’re just commuting [a few miles], you could use it for a full week before you need to plug in. Then it’s a four-hour recharge when it’s completely dead.” (Of course, you don’t have to wait for it to get to zero if you want a shorter charge time.)
The Cyrusher doesn’t have the reliable Bosch motor that higher-end bikes sport and the Samsung battery is only good for around 500 recharges, which is less than you’d expect for a lithium battery. But with the low price point, there are bound to be some compromises. A great option if you want a decent, all-around model for easy trails or commuting.

Not all e-bikes take the form of conventional push-bikes with an incorporated motor, such as the Cytronex bicycles which use a small battery disguised as a water bottle.[44][45] Some are designed to take the appearance of low capacity motorcycles, but smaller in size and consisting of an electric motor rather than a petrol engine. For example, the Sakura e-bike incorporates a 200 W motor found on standard e-bikes, but also includes plastic cladding, front and rear lights, and a speedometer. It is styled as a modern moped, and is often mistaken for one.[citation needed]


The way they work is pretty simple: The motor kicks in with extra assist when you pedal, and there are different levels of assistance. That's it. Just turn it on, pedal, and go! You can also turn the assist mode off and ride it like a regular bike. And e-bikes stop assisting at a certain speed (in the U.S., it's 20 mph or 28 mph depending on class) for safety, of course. 

Sometimes space comes at the most premium of commodities and the Tern Vektron offers a space-saving folding option. At about $3,400, the sturdy folding joints include a magnet and rubber strap to keep the bike folded. The quick-release pedals (wheels release too) help with storage of a bike that doesn’t give up power with a 20-mph speed that can range over 60 miles. But the best part is placing two in the trunk of a car.


For many bikes, battery range is more important that total power (because they're all pretty powerful). You want a bike that delivers a range long enough for your rides at the power levels you want. Most e-bikes will have three to five levels of assist kicking in anywhere from 25 percent of you pedal power to 200 percent boost. Consider how fast the battery takes to recharge, especially if you'll be using your bike for long commutes.
×